What is potassium argon dating used for

The resulting C-14 is unstable and decays back to N-14 with a measured half-life of approximately 5,730 years.Thus the ratio of stable C-12 to unstable C-14, which is known in today's open environment, changes over time in an isolated specimen. As long as the tree lives, it absorbs carbon from the atmosphere in the form of carbon dioxide, both C-12 and C-14.Argon was discovered in 1894 by English chemist John William Strutt, most commonly known as Lord Rayleigh (1842-1919), and Scottish chemist William Ramsay (1852-1916).It was the first of the noble gases to be isolated.Dating schemes based on rates of radioactivity have been refined and scrutinized for several decades.The latest high-tech equipment permits reliable results to be obtained even with microscopic samples.As the air warms, different elements change from a liquid back to a gas.The portion of air that changes back to a gas at -185.86°C (-302.55°F) is argon.

Here is one example of an isochron, based on measurements of basaltic meteorites (in this case the resulting date is 4.4 billion years) [Basaltic1981, pg. Skeptics of old-earth geology make great hay of these examples.

and stick the quarter in between and keep it there all night, and next morning you couldn't see no brass, and it wouldn't feel greasy no more, and so anybody in town would take it in a minute, let alone a hair-ball.

to it, for size; but then there are worlds in other systems that Jupiter isn't even a mustard-seed to - like the planet Goobra, for instance, which you couldn't squeeze inside the orbit of Halley's comet without straining the rivets.

Radiometric dating is self-checking, because the data (after certain preliminary calculations are made) are fitted to a straight line (an "isochron") by means of standard linear regression methods of statistics.

The slope of the line determines the date, and the closeness of fit is a measure of the statistical reliability of the resulting date.

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